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Größentabelle

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Brust
    (cm)
    74
    bis
    77
    78
    bis
    81
    82
    bis
    85
    86
    bis
    89
    90
    bis
    93
    94
    bis
    97
    Taille
    (cm)
    59
    bis
    62
    63
    bis
    66
    67
    bis
    70
    71
    bis
    74
    75
    bis
    78
    79
    bis
    82
    Hüfte
    (cm)
    83
    bis
    86
    87
    bis
    90
    91
    bis
    94
    95
    bis
    98
    99
    bis
    102
    103
    bis
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Brust
    (cm)
    86
    bis
    89
    90
    bis
    93
    94
    bis
    97
    98
    bis
    101
    102
    bis
    105
    106
    bis
    109
    Taille
    (cm)
    73
    bis
    76
    77
    bis
    80
    81
    bis
    84
    85
    bis
    88
    89
    bis
    92
    93
    bis
    96
    Hüfte
    (cm)
    87
    bis
    90
    91
    bis
    94
    95
    bis
    98
    99
    bis
    102
    103
    bis
    106
    107
    bis
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Circa Werte)

In the studio

CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

The German artist Stefan Marx is renowned for his humorous writing and drawings. He uses impressions, sentences and quotes (from word combinations to poetic) that he has picked up in his everyday life and creates images eliciting both reflection and chuckles. We visited him in his studio in Berlin and asked him a few questions – about ideal working conditions, dog observations and his exhibition that is currently showing in the Hamburg Kunsthalle.

CLOSED – Since 1978
CLOSED – Since 1978

The
Interview

Our joint collection features a poodle and a Rare Pleasures lettering. Can you tell us a little bit about these two works?

I’ve been invested in drawing dogs for a long time – they belong to the drawings that I mostly do outside, not in the studio, but when I walk through the city, am in the train or wherever I happen to be sitting when I see dogs. Rare Pleasssures is a classic bit of typographic work of mine. My lettering work deals with an array of subjects – mostly the pictures are about an emotional state of some sort or about melancholy. I try to trigger something in the viewers with these kinds of works or rather they trigger something in me, and it depends a bit on how the viewers tick as to whether it works for them or not.

How do you go about new work?

I collect many ideas for paintings and then, in the studio, have a look at which formats these ideas might fill, or the other way around, which ideas can fill the formats. I usually make preliminary sketches with the lettering to plan out the composition, the typesetting or the hyphenation – where word breaks should be, what word needs to take up which amount of space, etc. But it’s work by approximation, not incredibly precise. I’m always hoping for some kind of mistakes or wonderful things to happen that you can’t really plan ahead.

Under which conditions do you work best?

No appointments and a certain state of equanimity. My own studio or my home or some places that I know. Having said that – I work well when I travel, too.

What do you enjoy the very most about your work?

The work itself, drawing. Every single page, every single canvas – the work itself. Or to think in terms of the different formats, from exhibition to book format. And of course I appreciate having the chance to show my work to other people. It’s a great privilege to have people reflect on it. And to even get feedback is a true gift.

The exhibition “Klasse Gesellschaft” (“Class Society”) is currently being shown at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, which presents the works of Old Masters together with your works and those of Lars Eidinger. How did you go about the concept?

The director of the Old Masters at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Sandra Pisot, envisaged the exhibition to establish a relationship between our works and those of the Old Masters. I had a look at the paintings and focused on which topics were being conveyed to me, what image concepts were floating around at the time, which problems and societal conditions the pictures portrayed. I compared these with my own take on society and looked at what parallels were there within my fields of interest.

Can you give us an example?

On the catalogue cover, the so-called messenger of love, all stooped and demure, enters a posh room, handing over a letter to a woman who is wearing very lovely clothes. You can’t see anything else, but there’s great play with light, and the painting style is excellent of course. I once painted a piece called “Pardon my late response”. That’s something everybody is saying these days, or at least you have a bad conscience for not answering emails or text messages immediately. The exhibition presents the two of these next to each other – the imagery from the 17th century by the Dutch Old Masters and my own wording – and something happens as a result. One is able to draw parallels, remember personal experiences or failures, but also maybe wonderful things that have arisen as a consequence. We are a kind of catalyst igniting the viewers’ thought processes.

Did you also create new works for the exhibition?

Yes, I produced a few things. I also traced the figures of a few scenes that occur in the paintings: dogs, but also drinking sessions, the party atmosphere and some meanwhile perhaps quite politically incorrect things – I found it all profoundly interesting. I also used paintings from my own inventory. It was incredible how many fit the bill. On the posters for the exhibition, there’s a picture of mine called “I’ll be your mirror”. The director chose it as a cover image because the exhibition is also about holding up the same mirror to today’s society that the Dutch Old Masters held up at the time – and everybody having to deal with it in their own way. It is not a given – everyone has their own responsibility in terms of how to interact with the mirror, what he or she recognises or doesn’t recognise. I am very intrigued to find out how viewers will react to it and what they will take from the exhibition.

Stefan Marx will be part of the exhibition „Klasse Gesellschaft“ (“Class Society”) until 27 March 2022 at the Hamburger Kunsthalle: Dutch 17th century paintings meet with works by Stefan Marx and Lars Eidinger. By reflecting on the given themes and motifs, the two artists place them in a broader context and thereby overcome traditional boundaries.

Our joint collection features a poodle and a Rare Pleasures lettering. Can you tell us a little bit about these two works?

I’ve been invested in drawing dogs for a long time – they belong to the drawings that I mostly do outside, not in the studio, but when I walk through the city, am in the train or wherever I happen to be sitting when I see dogs. Rare Pleasssures is a classic bit of typographic work of mine. My lettering work deals with an array of subjects – mostly the pictures are about an emotional state of some sort or about melancholy. I try to trigger something in the viewers with these kinds of works or rather they trigger something in me, and it depends a bit on how the viewers tick as to whether it works for them or not.

How do you go about new work?

I collect many ideas for paintings and then, in the studio, have a look at which formats these ideas might fill, or the other way around, which ideas can fill the formats. I usually make preliminary sketches with the lettering to plan out the composition, the typesetting or the hyphenation – where word breaks should be, what word needs to take up which amount of space, etc. But it’s work by approximation, not incredibly precise. I’m always hoping for some kind of mistakes or wonderful things to happen that you can’t really plan ahead.

Under which conditions do you work best?

No appointments and a certain state of equanimity. My own studio or my home or some places that I know. Having said that – I work well when I travel, too.

What do you enjoy the very most about your work?

The work itself, drawing. Every single page, every single canvas – the work itself. Or to think in terms of the different formats, from exhibition to book format. And of course I appreciate having the chance to show my work to other people. It’s a great privilege to have people reflect on it. And to even get feedback is a true gift.

The exhibition “Klasse Gesellschaft” (“Class Society”) is currently being shown at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, which presents the works of Old Masters together with your works and those of Lars Eidinger. How did you go about the concept?

The director of the Old Masters at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Sandra Pisot, envisaged the exhibition to establish a relationship between our works and those of the Old Masters. I had a look at the paintings and focused on which topics were being conveyed to me, what image concepts were floating around at the time, which problems and societal conditions the pictures portrayed. I compared these with my own take on society and looked at what parallels were there within my fields of interest.

Can you give us an example?

On the catalogue cover, the so-called messenger of love, all stooped and demure, enters a posh room, handing over a letter to a woman who is wearing very lovely clothes. You can’t see anything else, but there’s great play with light, and the painting style is excellent of course. I once painted a piece called “Pardon my late response”.

That’s something everybody is saying these days, or at least you have a bad conscience for not answering emails or text messages immediately. The exhibition presents the two of these next to each other – the imagery from the 17th century by the Dutch Old Masters and my own wording – and something happens as a result. One is able to draw parallels, remember personal experiences or failures, but also maybe wonderful things that have arisen as a consequence. We are a kind of catalyst igniting the viewers’ thought processes.

Did you also create new works for the exhibition?

Yes, I produced a few things. I also traced the figures of a few scenes that occur in the paintings: dogs, but also drinking sessions, the party atmosphere and some meanwhile perhaps quite politically incorrect things – I found it all profoundly interesting. I also used paintings from my own inventory. It was incredible how many fit the bill. On the posters for the exhibition, there’s a picture of mine called “I’ll be your mirror”. The director chose it as a cover image because the exhibition is also about holding up the same mirror to today’s society that the Dutch Old Masters held up at the time – and everybody having to deal with it in their own way. It is not a given – everyone has their own responsibility in terms of how to interact with the mirror, what he or she recognises or doesn’t recognise. I am very intrigued to find out how viewers will react to it and what they will take from the exhibition.

Stefan Marx will be part of the exhibition „Klasse Gesellschaft“ (“Class Society”) until 27 March 2022 at the Hamburger Kunsthalle: Dutch 17th century paintings meet with works by Stefan Marx and Lars Eidinger. By reflecting on the given themes and motifs, the two artists place them in a broader context and thereby overcome traditional boundaries.

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CLOSED – Since 1978

I’m always hoping for some kind of mistakes or wonderful things to happen that you can’t really plan ahead.

Sale Denim Worker Jacket

150 ¤ 300 ¤

Stefan Marx Portemonnaie

120 ¤

Verfügbare Farben

Stefan Marx Kartenetui

100 ¤

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Stefan Marx T-Shirt mit Print

70 ¤

Stefan Marx is part of the exhibition „Klasse Gesellschaft“ (“Class Society”) until 27 March 2022 at the Hamburger Kunsthalle: Dutch 17th century paintings meet with works by Stefan Marx and Lars Eidinger. By reflecting on the given themes and motifs, the two artists place them in a broader context and thereby overcome traditional boundaries.

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